Tag Archives: Civitas

McCrory leads in N.C. governor’s race

The presidential race in North Carolina is not the only contest we polled likely voters on. But gubernatorial candidate Walter Dalton probably wishes it were.

If the election were held today, Republican Pat McCrory swamps Democrat Dalton among likely voters 52% to 37%. Much of that is name recognition. McCrory, who ran for governor four years ago, has it. Lt. Gov. Dalton doesn’t, at least not yet.

Dalton told the Charlotte Observer that he isn’t worried. “We have plenty of time left; people really have not focused on the race,” he said. “I really don’t go crazy about the polls right now.”

That’s probably a good thing. The conservative-leaning Civitas Poll has McCrory leading with unaffiliated voters, 46% to 29%. The Democratic-leaning PPP has it McCrory 45%-39%.

— John Robinson

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Obama-Romney in N.C.: It’s tight, still

While the Elon University Poll conducted last week reported that Gov. Romney has a 47%-to-43% lead over President Obama in North Carolina, other polls of the state reported slightly different results.

Public Policy Polling, which leans Democratic, has the race tied up, 48%-48%. A High Point University/Fox8 poll has Romney at 46% and Obama at 43%. Interestingly, a few days earlier, HPU reported poll results showing the race deadlocked at 43%. And a Civitas Poll, which leans Republican, has the race in a dead heat at 45% each.

But if you’re serious about comparing, make sure you read the methodology and the margin of error at each of the sites. They differ vastly.

— John Robinson

Support for North Carolina public schools?

Are North Carolinians happy with their public schools? Depends on how you ask.

Earlier this month, the Civitas Institute, a conservative organization, released a poll that said “more than half (52 percent) of respondents rated North Carolina’s public school system as “Only fair” (37 percent) or “Poor” (15 percent).”

Today, N.C. Policy Watch, a progressive organization, released its Carolinas Watch poll that said that 48% of North Carolinians have a generally favorable impression of public schools vs. 34% unfavorable, and that 65% believe schools should get more funding.

For the record, last month’s Elon University Poll results show that most North Carolinians would support a temporary three-fourths of a cent sales tax to fund education 53% to 43%.

— John Robinson